Tag Archives: Reviews

Mother! (2017)

Mother! weaves so many threads and asks so many questions that grappling with the whole picture in less than 1000 words is daunting. In many ways, the film is about the entire history of humanity condensed into one house and two hours of run-time. Evoking both the life-cycles of The Fountain and the Judeo Christian traditions of Noah, writer/director Darren Aronofsky uses Mother! to meld of his Eastern and Western ideas into one film. Continue reading Mother! (2017)

Pan’s Labyrinth (2006)

What is the power of a story? As much as people enjoy stories, it’s often easy to dismiss stories, especially works of fiction, as things that hold little power or meaning. The self-important and pragmatic will often dismiss works of fiction as “just stories,” the kind of material meant to teach children basic moral lessons or feed the minds of less high-minded people. Continue reading Pan’s Labyrinth (2006)

Breath of the Wild: Zelda Meets Far Cry 2

Nintendo’s latest Zelda game is not what you’d expect. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild features weapon degradation, fire propagation, a minimalist map design, respawning enemy checkpoints–and deja vu, I experienced all these mechanics before in one of my all-time favorite games: Far Cry 2. Continue reading Breath of the Wild: Zelda Meets Far Cry 2

Tacoma

Fullbright’s first release, Gone Home, failed to grip me as much as I hoped it would. The gradual exploration of the Greenbriar’s home had you assembling together a story through boring audio logs and environmental cludes. It felt too familiar to techniques used in AAA games to deliver narrative and the story didn’t resonate with me. I appreciated what it tried to build, but found the house felt rather empty and cold by the end of the game. Continue reading Tacoma

Jamaica Inn (1939)

Alfred Hitchcock’s British productions are strange ebb and flow of unsuitable projects, promising pictures, and magnificent works. By the time he makes The Lady Vanishes, his voice is clear. The building tension and the dry, dark humor produced many lovely films. But Hitchcock continued to struggle in the British film system and Jamaica Inn would be his final British production: a frustrating picture maligned by studio politics. Continue reading Jamaica Inn (1939)