The Can Opener’s Daughter

The Motherless Oven is one of the best graphic novels I’ve read in the past few years. Comics often take risks and go bold in ways most other mediums don’t; but those risks often leads to comics that are silly, absurd or just plain bonkers. Characters in fantastic universes talk like they’re hip teens from our own times and the cool factor is favored over a cogent, logical world and tone. Continue reading The Can Opener’s Daughter

Wonder Woman (2017)

DC Films hasn’t put out a decent film in almost a decade. Loud, brash, abrasive films with overlong runtimes, grim tones, and bland, muted color palettes comprise just about everything that’s wrong with the superhero genre. Instead of letting up on the oppression, DC Films doubled down placing Zack Snyder as the visionary for a DC expanded universe. Therefore, I had no expectations for Wonder Woman. Continue reading Wonder Woman (2017)

Interstellar (2014)

There are so many moments where it’s clear Interstellar wants to be the 2001: A Space Odyssey of the 21st century. But screenwriters Jonathan and Christopher Nolan never have the guts to leave the audience perplexed. Stanley Kubrick’s arthouse science fiction classic is mostly notable for lengthy, wordless sequences, many of which leave the audience gasping for some understanding of what is happening. Continue reading Interstellar (2014)

The Lost City of Z (2016)

James Gray is the most underrated director in America. He continues to make gorgeous, moving dramas while working with big-name actors in some of their best performances. His previous four films (The Yards, We Own the Night, Two Lovers, & The Immigrant) were all nominated for a Palme d’Or, giving him decent international clout, but in America his films have yet to receive an Oscar nomination. Continue reading The Lost City of Z (2016)

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