Category Archives: Games

Top 50 Video Games (2018): 31-40

  1. Shadow of the Colossus

There’s something about the first time you encounter each colossus, the simultaneous majestic  awe mingled with looming dread that you’re going to have to find a way to bring it down. It’s a game constantly at tension with itself, beautiful and barren, awe-inspiring and haunting. There’s a hallowed feeling to this game, like you’ve stepped on sacred ground when you entered this world and no other game I’ve played evokes that feeling so perfectly. Continue reading Top 50 Video Games (2018): 31-40

Top 50 Video Games (2018): 41-50

  1. The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind

Video games have a tendency to want to replicate our world too much. With the potential for anything you could imagine, why not dream of something strange and bizarre? Morrowind does just this, presenting one of the most distinct and rich game worlds seeping with its own mythologies, ideologies, and politics that keep the main quest fascinating all the way up to the end. Continue reading Top 50 Video Games (2018): 41-50

Life is Strange

Dontnod’s Life is Strange is a rare delight in video games: one built around a cast of relatable characters that come across as human and strong as the best stories in any medium. While the medium lacks the realism and nuance of a human performance, it’s a reminder of how far games have strived when a video game story can be as bold, moving and gripping as primetime TV or award-winning movies. Continue reading Life is Strange

Breath of the Wild: Zelda Meets Far Cry 2

Nintendo’s latest Zelda game is not what you’d expect. The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild features weapon degradation, fire propagation, a minimalist map design, respawning enemy checkpoints–and deja vu, I experienced all these mechanics before in one of my all-time favorite games: Far Cry 2. Continue reading Breath of the Wild: Zelda Meets Far Cry 2

Tacoma

Fullbright’s first release, Gone Home, failed to grip me as much as I hoped it would. The gradual exploration of the Greenbriar’s home had you assembling together a story through boring audio logs and environmental cludes. It felt too familiar to techniques used in AAA games to deliver narrative and the story didn’t resonate with me. I appreciated what it tried to build, but found the house felt rather empty and cold by the end of the game. Continue reading Tacoma